taming of the shrew katherine monologue analysis

Petruchio asks Kate to tell the other wives what duty they owe to their husbands. Character: PETRUCHIO. In Act 5, Scene 2, Katherine has a monologue where she explains why women must be obedient to their husbands. While the play, The Taming of the Shrew, was a comedy, there are also some very dark themes to this monologue, but that doesn’t change the fact that in the end, Katherine and Pertrucio were made to be. The monologues are organized by play, then categorized by comedy, history and tragedy. Bonnie’s Analysis of The Taming of the Shrew. The play Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare, written in 1590-1592, takes place in Italy. “To wound thy lord, thy king, thy governor. The Taming of the Shrew essays are academic essays for citation. The third interpretation is the interpretation which I believe is the way Katherine delivers this monologue. Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. The larger framework involves a drunkard named Christopher Sly, who stumbles out of an inn and falls into a deep sleep. Character description, analysis and casting breakdown for Katharina (Katherine / Kate) Minola from The Taming of the Shrew In the play, The Taming of the Shrew, written by William Shakespeare; the lead Character, Katherine Baptista says a final monologue which, in my opinion, sums up the entirety of her views of the last few months of her life. Katherina's monologue from Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew. The relationship between Katherine and Petruchio in Shakespeare’s play The Taming of the Shrew has long been contested. In The Taming of the Shrew, Kate goes through a fantastic transformation from a harsh spitfire to a spirited yet submissive wife.This transformation is due to Petruchio’s over-the-top kindness towards Kate and cruelty towards all others. Baptista, Vincentio, Gremio, the merchant who had pretended to be Vincentio, Lucentio, Bianca, Petruchio, and Katherine are all present. She clearly abhors society’s expectations that she obey her father and show grace and courtesy toward her suitors. The Taming of the Shrew is the story of how Petruchio, the money-grubbing wife hunter, transforms the aggressive and bad-tempered Katherine Minola into an obedient, honey-tongued trophy wife. It can be interpreted that Katherine has fully been tamed by Petruchio, that she is being sarcastic and mocking Petruchio, or something in between those. Critical analysis on the taming of Katherine by Petruchio. She believes that women should have an equal say as men do. O, how I long to have some chat with her! And while she performs manners that are considered rebellious to others, to Pertrucio, they are just reminders of the similarities between them. She understands that she has made some mistakes of her own, but perhaps that is why she, and her new husband, are such an amazing couple. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. Katherine throughout the whole novel has been a  feminist and a non-believer in following whatever the man says. Taming of the Shrew Essay In The Taming of the Shrew, Kate goes through a fantastic transformation from a harsh spitfire to a spirited yet submissive wife. Katherine begins a long speech, detailing the importance of a wife's submission to her husband. Some people regard Katherine as an anti-feminist protagonist. O, how I long to have some chat with her! Essays for The Taming of the Shrew. The Taming of the Shrew essays are academic essays for citation. Some scholars believe it may have been his first work written for the stage as well as his first comedy (Shakespearean 310). Location: Act II, sc. 1. Similarities Between Taming Of The Shrew And 10 Things I Hate About You 866 Words | 4 Pages. At the same time, however, Katherine must see that given the rigidity of her social situation, her only hope to find a secure and happy place in the world lies in finding a husband. Change ), You are commenting using your Facebook account. Making it easier to find monologues since 1997. Act, Scene, Line (Click to see in context) Speech text: 1. Katherine's Monologue The fruits of Petruchio's 'taming' are seen at the very end of the play. Because she is stubborn, is sometimes ill-mannered, and does not allow herself to be ordered around by men, she is constantly insulted, made fun of, and otherwise denigrated by practically all the other characters in the play. I believe that Katherine’s monologue is somewhere in between. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. You can browse and/or search so you can find a monologue whether you know which one you want, or you're looking for monologue ideas. Analysis Some critics regard this scene as one of the more enigmatic in Shakespearean comedy, but such a claim is really unwarranted. With Katherine being fully tamed this would be a misogynistic play. If this monologue is sarcastic, this play would be an extremely feminist play which would have been a very radical idea when Shakespeare wrote this, if this play was mocking marriage, this would have also been an extreme concept in the late fifteen hundreds. Character: PETRUCHIO. It did inspire a very robust musical called Kiss Me Kate which is enjoyed by audiences. This transformation is due to Petruchio’s over-the-top kindness towards Kate and cruelty towards all others. Katherine is established as a "shrew"—a loud, unmanageable, bad-tempered woman—by her own behavior and by … Bonnie’s Analysis of The Taming of the Shrew. Kate is speaking in a way that is shrewd-like and overly-sarcastic for her time, but would be considered bold and admirable by todays standards. Even the wedding guests can't believe how much her behavior has changed. The Taming of the Shrew is the story of how Petruchio, the money-grubbing wife hunter, transforms the aggressive and bad-tempered Katherine Minola into an obedient, honey-tongued trophy wife. To help you look at any scene in The Taming of The Shrew and begin to analyse it, it’s important to ask questions about how it's written and why. Location: Act II, sc. Essays for The Taming of the Shrew. Katherine is too independent and stubborn to fully follow Petruchio. Isobel Reed. Read our selection of The Taming of the Shrew quotes along with speaker, act and scene. And, as a conflicting view, She is grateful to her husband for all his trouble, but she knows some of what he did was truly wrong. This Shakespeare play is not often touted as a favorite. Katherine Minola is a fiery, spirited woman, and as such, the male dominated world around her doesn't quite know what to do with her. I,1,353 [To BAPTISTA] I pray you, sir, is it your will To make a stale of me amongst these mates? Petruchio is one of two central characters (along with Katherine) in Shakespeare’s play, The Taming of the Shrew.. Petruchio is a wealthy young bachelor looking for an equally rich wife. In the play, The Taming of the Shrew, written by William Shakespeare; the lead Character, Katherine Baptista says a final monologue which, in my opinion, sums up the entirety of her views of the last few months of her life.There are many different point of views in this piece, and when talking of her own opinions, there are the most different views of all. In writing his comedies, Shakespeare was,to a great extent, influenced by classical Roman and Italian mockery andcomedy. KATE: Fie, fie, unknit that threat'ning unkind brow And dart not scornful glances from those eyes To wound thy lord, thy king, thy governor. The servants Tranio, Grumio, and Biondello are there as … Change ), You are commenting using your Twitter account. 196) This shows that if Katherine was speaking sarcastically why wouldn’t Petruchio get mad, but instead they kiss and both exit the stage hand-in-hand. Taming of the Shrew Essay. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. Search. She constantly insults and degrades the men around her, and she is prone to wild displays of anger, during which she may physically attack whomever enrages her. I,1,353 [To BAPTISTA] I pray you, sir, is it your will To make a stale of me amongst these mates? Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. With this monologue being able to change the main concept in this play, I think that readers perceive this monologue as I do. The Taming of the Shrew. This can be recognized at the end of Katherine’s monologue Petruchio says “Why, there’s a wench! The Taming of the Shrew Questions and Answers - Discover the eNotes.com community of teachers, mentors and students just like you that can answer any question you might have on The Taming of the Shrew I also believe that this ending would be too simple and Shakespeare’s plays always have underlying, deeper messages. The Taming of the Shrew: Kate’s soliloquy Kate’s soliloquy bring about a joyous conclusion to The Taming of the Shrew. Character description, analysis and casting breakdown for Katharina (Katherine / Kate) Minola from The Taming of the Shrew She tells the wives, "Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper, / Thy head, thy sovereign," (v.2.162-163). Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. Some people regard Katherine as an anti-feminist protagonist. You can browse and/or search so you can find a monologue whether you know which one you want, or you're looking for monologue ideas. Analysis. Skip navigation Sign in. Like so much in Shakespeare, the monologues in The Taming of the Shrew are open to multiple interpretations. Kate’s speech in Act 5, scene 2 of Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew is proof of her strong use of sarcasm. Search. The Taming of the Shrew is in fact a play within a play. In the play, The Taming of the Shrew, written by William Shakespeare; the lead Character, Katherine Baptista says a final monologue which, in my opinion, sums up the entirety of her views of the last few months of her life.There are many different point of views in this piece, and when talking of her own opinions, there are the most different views of all. I,1,357. His ability to think ahead of his time made and still make his plays beautiful and relatable. ( Log Out /  Katherine is the "shrew" of the play's title. Change ). The Taming of the Shrew. First Line: Now, by the world, it is a lusty wench; I love her ten times more than e’er I did. ... Kate's Final Speech Analysis - Duration: ... Taming of the Shrew Katherine Monologue - … Shakespeare’s plays are driven by their characters and every choice that’s made about words, structure and rhythm tells you something about the person, their relationships or their mood in that moment. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Taming of the Shrew and what it means. “I am ashamed that women are so simple to offer war where they should kneel for peace, or seek for rule, supremacy, and sway,” -The Taming of the Shrew. The submissiveacceptance of the wives in the source stories is illustrated in play during the energetic, sparkling, and finally loving exchange between Petruchio and Katherine. Character: PETRUCHIO. Some scholars believe it may have been his first work written for the stage as well as his first comedy (Shakespearean 310). I' faith, sir, you shall never need to fear; ( Log Out /  Read the monologue for the role of Katharina from the script for Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. You can browse and/or search so you can find a monologue whether you know which one you want, or you're looking for monologue ideas. The Taming of the Shrew: Moment Analysis Particular moments in William Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew have a special significance in regard to the overall meaning of the play. With this monologue being able to change the main concept in this play, I think that readers perceive this monologue as I do. Katharina says: No shame but mine: I must, forsooth, be … Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katherine shall be fine. The Taming of the Shrew. Read full Petruchio Monologue; 3. Written by William Shakespeare between 1590 and 1594, it's one of Shakespeare's earliest Comedies – it's also one of his most controversial works. ( Log Out /  Petruchio believes that women should do what their men say. If Petruchio could be paid the right amount of money, then he would indeed make an attempt of taming Katherine. The Taming of the Shrew Widely reputed throughout Padua to be a shrew, Katherine is foul-tempered and sharp-tongued at the start of the play. THE TAMING OF THE SHREW A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare. Read full Petruchio Monologue; 3. She is known throughout the town for her angry abrasive manner. A complete database of Shakespeare's Monologues. ( Log Out /  Because she is stubborn, is sometimes ill-mannered, and does not allow herself to be ordered around by men, she is constantly insulted, made fun of, and otherwise denigrated by practically all the other characters in the play. 1. Katherine is established as a "shrew"—a loud, unmanageable, bad-tempered woman—by her own behavior and by … Katherina is a very different main character than most of Shakespeare’s heroines. One such moment is when Petruchio and Katherine talk about “how bright and goodly shines the moon,” (Shakespeare 13). I,1,357. Baptista Minola. The monologue Katherine has in Act 5, Scene 2, can change a main plot in this play. This Shakespeare play is not often touted as a favorite. Katherina is a very different main character than most of Shakespeare’s heroines. The earliest record of … Justin Buckner 2,239 views. Come on and kiss me, Kate.” (5.2. The Taming of the Shrew: Kate’s soliloquy Kate’s soliloquy bring about a joyous conclusion to The Taming of the Shrew. Kate has always had a sarcastic side when talking about her husband Pertrucio, and that is shown here in her final words of the play. Shakespeare works his magic again in writing this play and making the reader fully think and ponder the possible interpretations of Katherine’s monologue and many more monologues he has written in other plays. Indeed, it is hard to accept such lines as these: "Such duty as the subject owes the prince,/Even such a woman oweth to her husband;/And when she is forward, peevish, sullen, sour,/And not obedient to his honest will,/What is she but a foul contending rebel/And graceless traitor to her loving lord?" The Taming of the Shrew is one of the earliest comedies written by sixteenth and seventeenth century English bard, William Shakespeare. 2. The Taming of the Shrew Introduction. A Lord passing by notices Sly and decides to play a trick on him. Fearing their power, Zeus split them into to separate parts, condemning them to spend their lives in search of their other halves.” -Plato’s the Symposium, at least we know that they succeeded. While it does show later in the monologue that Katherine really does love her husband, that still leaves room for the interpretation that Kate has not lost the cynical view on life that is not entirely untruthful. If Petruchio could be paid the right amount of money, then he would indeed make an attempt of taming Katherine. Word Count: 1022. God send you joy, Petruchio! Taken literally, they seem to endorse the idea of a man torturing his wife into submission. However, the way Kate says it, and the word choices she uses (lord, king governor), makes the reader question if she is really as serious as she claims with the matter at hand; or, more reasonably, she still resents having to worship her husband, no matter how much she loves him. It can change from being an extremely feminist play to being a play about actually fulling taming a shrew. Loading ... Kate's Final Speech Analysis - Duration: 18:08. Analysis of Petruchios Soliloquy Act 4, Scene 1 At the end of act 4 scene 1 in The Taming of The Shrew, Petruchio has a soliloquy in which he tells the audience of his plan to tame Katherina. 2. On a visit to Padua someone tells him about a shrewish woman in the city whose family is trying to marry her off so that her younger, beautiful, sweet-tempered, sister, Bianca, can be married. Katherine is the "shrew" of the play's title. Katherine monologue from Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. A complete database of Shakespeare's Monologues. Essays for The Taming of the Shrew. Read full Petruchio Monologue; 2. The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare is a controversial play that arouses a debate over the role of Katherine. While the play, The Taming of the Shrew, was a comedy, there are also some very dark themes to this monologue, but that doesn’t change the fact that in the end, Katherine and Pertrucio were made to be. I' faith, sir, you shall never need to fear; She is courted by both Hortensio and Lucentio, who dress as tutors to get near her. Location: Act II, sc. Critics struggle to make sense of the intended message of the play, particularly Katherine’s lengthy ending monologue, which does not at all align with her character type from the beginning of the play. However, in fact, if we delve into it, adapting feminist interpretation, there are many clues, indicating Katherine is a woman who is Location: Act II, sc. The book is a comedy, mainly about Petruchio and his wife Kate. Word Count: 1022. The audience leaves the theatre with a pleasant feeling, glad that such a shrew could be tamed so well. The second interpretation also would make the reader believe that Shakespeare is mocking marriage which would be a very unpopular concept in the 1590’s and could make this play a failure, instead this is one of Shakespeare’s most popular comedies.

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